Promoting Intellectual Qualtiy with an IWB

Wow, how times have changed…out with the old blackboards and in with the 21st Century Interactive Whiteboards (IWB’s).

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Kaczuwka, A (2008) Learning Solutions Magazine.  Available at: http://www.learningsolutionsmag.com/.

IWB’s have changed the teaching/learning world. According to Kent (2008), the IWB is a teaching tool that provides teachers with a wide range of possibilities through which they can create a supportive classroom environment.

The IWB gives the teacher access to audio, video, images such as animations, websites and interactive activities. It can also be used as the traditional blackboard. However, this depends on the teacher’s ability and willingness to effectively use it.

Inspiring lessons can be created and designed to target the 21st century learner. From early childhood, Generation Z has been exposed to technological devices. It makes sense then to harness this prior experience with visual aids that are available through the IWB.

From my observations in a Kindergarten classroom, the IWB assisted students retain attention that enhanced students learning outcomes. These students were engaged and having fun! Activities ranged from labelling, sequencing, sorting, puzzles and games which promoted intellectual quality.

However, whilst at high school, despite the IWB’s installed in classrooms, many were not used; perhaps due to teacher’s feeling more comfortable with traditional teaching methods. I therefore, missed out on the opportunity to be exposed to this form of intellectual quality teaching and feel disadvantaged, as I now understand the opportunities that the IWB offers.

I have always typically been a hand’s on student and that’s what the IWB makes it an effective tool…active participation. However, a teacher should not neglect the physical activities such as developing the fine motor gross skills in Early Stage 1 children, such as cut and paste activities.

Kent,P.(2008). Interactive Whiteboards: A practical guide for primary teachers. 2nd ed. Australia: Sharon Dalgleish.

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